Basic Snail Farming Tools and Equipment’s

Basic Snail Farming Tools and Equipment’s

Besides the customary gardening tools (shovel, hoe, rake, cutlass, broom), the following equipment and tools are needed in successful snail farming: Small weighing scale, for weighing snails and feed. Measuring tape, for measuring pens and snails Hand trowel, for digging in and cleaning out the pens. Water container and watering can, for keeping the soil moist and refilling water troughs. 5. Water and feeding troughs or dishes. Most important: a notebook, for carefully recording inputs (e.g. labor, materials and feed) and output of the snail farming venture.

Read More

Predators, Parasites and Diseases of Snail

Predators, Parasites and Diseases of Snail

Snail farmers must be aware of several predators, parasites and diseases if mortality rates are to be kept to a minimum. Snails have many natural predators, including members of all major vertebrate groups, carnivorous snails, ground beetles, leeches and even predatory caterpillars. Humans also pose great dangers to snails in the wild. Pollution and destruction of habitats have caused the extinction of some snail species in recent years. Human poachers pose a great danger to farm grown snails as well! Predators The major predators a snail farmer may have to…

Read More

Seasonal and Daily Management Practices for Snail

Seasonal and Daily Management Practices for Snail

As in any livestock farming operation, good management practices are the key to success. Most research on farming GALS has been carried out in West Africa. Seasonal activities, as described below, follow the march of the seasons of West Africa, with breeding and egg laying in March through July. Note that domesticated snails may continue laying during the dry season as well (Omole, et al. 2007). Snail breeders in other parts of the (sub)humid tropics should adapt the management cycle to local conditions. In semi-intensive or intensive snail farming, farmers…

Read More

Recommended Snail Rearing Density

Seasonal and Daily Management Practices for Snail

Density affects the growth and breeding capacity of snails. High-density populations tend to grow slowly, develop into smaller adults, and lay fewer clutches of eggs and fewer eggs per clutch. If the snails are very densely packed, they may not breed at all. The accumulating slime suppresses reproduction. Other disadvantages of high density are the high rates of parasitism and ease of transmission of diseases. In terms of snail weight, the recommended density is 1-1.5 kg per m2(for A. achatina, this would be about 15 to 25 snails per square…

Read More

Recommended Methods of Selecting Snail Breeding Stock

Recommended Methods of Selecting Snail Breeding Stock

It is recommended to use sexually mature snails, weighing at least 100-125 g, as initial breeding stock. Farming should preferably start at the onset of the wet season, because that is the time snails normally start to breed. Until snail farms become self-sustaining, farmers may have to collect snails from the wild or buy them cheaply in the peak season and fatten them in captivity in the off season. In relatively undisturbed forest areas, snails can be collected on days following rains. Snails are active at night and on cloudy…

Read More

How to Choose a Snail Farming System

Basic Snail Farming Tools and Equipment’s

The type and dimensions of your snailery depend on the snail growing system you choose, and on the quantity of snails you intend to produce. As far is housing is concerned, your snail farm could be extensive, semi-intensive, or intensive, in increasing order of complexity, management and financial inputs. Three options might be considered: Extensive system: outdoor, free-range snail pens. Mixed, or semi-intensive system: egg laying and hatching occur in a controlled environment; the young snails are then removed after 6-8 weeks to outside pens for growing or fattening or…

Read More

The Different Types of Snail Food

Seasonal and Daily Management Practices for Snail

Snails are vegetarian and will accept many types of food. All snails will avoid plants that have hairy leaves or produce toxic chemicals, like physic nut (Jathropa curcas). Young snails prefer tender leaves and shoots; they consume about twice as much feed as mature snails. As they get older, mature snails increasingly feed on detritus: fallen leaves, rotten fruit and humus. Older snails should be fed the same items as immature snails. If a change in the diet has to be made, the new food items should be introduced gradually.…

Read More

Different Materials used for building Snail Houses

Basic Snail Farming Tools and Equipment’s

Snail farming is a very lucrative business, not just is it less capital intensive, it also have a huge profit potential. Today, we are going to be discussing about some of the materials that can be used in building snail houses depending on their cost and available, they include: 1. Decay and Termite-Resistant Timber: In West Africa favorable tree species are iroko (Milicia excelsa, local name – odum), opepe (Naucleadiderrichii, local name – kusia), or ekki (Lophira alata, local name – kaku). While in South East Asia poles can be…

Read More

Impact of Soil Characteristics on Snails

Impact of Soil Characteristics on Snails

With soil being a major part of a snail’s habitat. Soil composition, water content and texture are important factors to consider in site selection due to the following reasons: The snail’s shell is made up mainly of calcium derived from the soil and from feed. Snails derive most of their water requirements from the soil. Snails dig in the soil to lay their eggs and to rest during the dry season. Because of all these reasons, it is essential that the soil is loose and that its calcium and water…

Read More

Reasons why Snails Aestivate and How to Prevent it

Predators, Parasites and Diseases of Snail

Aestivating snail sealed into its shell by a calcareous layer. Snails aestivate if the temperature is too high (> 30 °C) or if the air humidity is too low (< 70-75%) relative humidity. Snails hibernate if the temperature drops below 5 °C. For the snail farmer the result is the same: his (or her) snails become inactive and stop growing, losing valuable growing time, while expenses for housing, tending and protection continue. Consequently, it is in the snail farmer’s interest to prevent or at least reduce dormancy by selecting the…

Read More