Category: Plantain

Propping and Harvesting of Plantains

Propping The heavy weight of the plantain bunch bends all bearing plants and can cause doubling (pseudo stem breaks), snap-off (corm breaks, leaving a part in the ground) or uprooting also called top-over whereby the entire corm with root comes out of the ground. Plants are generally weak during the dry season

Inter-cropping of a plantain field and its Advantages

Plantain fields are arranged in rows spaced at about 3m x 2m. as the canopy closes only to about 5 to 6 months after planting, a fair amount of inter-row space remains un-exploited during the first months. This space can be used for plants which have a short life cycle and which

Recommended Plantain Fertilization Methods

In order to produce a heavy bunch, plantains always need some extra nutrients. These can be applied in the form of either inorganic or organic fertilizers (mulch, manure or ash from wood fires). Inorganic fertilizers have the advantages of easy handling and concentrated nutrients while organic fertilizers are very bulky, yet they

Mulching of Plantains and its Advantages

Organic matter is essential for plantain cultivation if the field is to be very productive for a long time. A high level of organic matter in the soil is beneficial because it stimulates root development, improves soil drainage, decreases soil temperature fluctuation and increases soil porosity and biological life. Organic matter decays

How to prepare Plantain Suckers for Planting

Suckers are separated from their mother plant with a spade or machete. The sucker corm must not be damaged or chipped. Consequently the corm should be carefully peeled with a machete. The pseudo stem of the suckers should be cut off a few centimeters above the corm. Peeling of the corm delays

How to select Plantain Cultivars

For field cultivation, medium plantains should be preferred to giant ones even though giant plantains produce heavier bunches. Giant plantains take longer to produce and are more likely to be damaged by strong winds because of their size. The decision whether to grow a French or a False Horn plantain cultivar should

The Recommended Spacing for Plantain Cultivation

The recommended spacing for planting plantain is 3m between the plantain rows and 2 m within the row (in other words. 3 m x 2 m). An alternative is 2.5 m x 2.5 m. If spaced 3 m x 2 m, 1 hectare should contain 1667 plants, but with a spacing of 2.5 m

Methods of field preparation for plantain farming

When preparing your fields for your plantain farming, you must be aware of the fact that fields are to be prepared with minimum disturbance to the soil (no-tillage farming). In consequence, manual clearing should be preferred to mechanical deforestation because bulldozers always remove topsoil with the important organic matter and compact the

Selecting a site for plantain farming? Things to consider

Selecting The Site There are some factors that must be considered when selecting a site for your plantain farming business which are as follows: 1) The site should be easily accessible, especially if the establishment of a large field is being planned. 2) It should be well drained but not too steeply

The Importance of Plantain Farming Business

Plantain is a staple crop grown throughout the tropics. In Africa, plantain and Banana are also an important source of carbohydrate in the diet of more than 70 million people. Plantain is also an important source of revenue for farmers who produce the crop in small-scale field plantations and Backyards. Backyard soil

Sowing Guide for Different kind of Crops

 Every crop farmer must be aware of the specie he/she wants to cultivate, the average number of seeds, the quantity for sowing per hectare and the crop density (Number of plants per hectare). This will help the farmer understand what his or her expectations are from the crops to be planted. Below

Introduction to Plantains and their Environment

Plantains (Musa spp., AAB genome) are plants producing fruits that remain starchy at maturity (Marriot and Lancaster, 1983; Robinson, 1996) and need processing before consumption. Plantain production in Africa is estimated at more than 50% of worldwide production (FAO, 1990). The majority (82%) of plantains in Africa are produced in the area

THE DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE PLANT-CROP PLANT FORMS

1. Shoots: Shoots target the above-ground business of the plant. Very young plants may possess only simple, undeveloped shoots. As a plant grows, however, these tender shoots develop into stems and leaves. So, stems and leaves are really part of the shoot system. Stems and leaves are so different and specialized that

Classification of Crops

Classification based on life span of crops/duration of crops: 1.1 One seasonal crops: these are the kind of crops that completes its life cycle in one season. E.g. rice, wheat etc. 1.2. Two seasonal crops: these are those kind crops that complete its life in two seasons. E.g. Cotton, turmeric, gingers 1.3.

Crop Plant Forms

1. Monocotyledonous crops: these are   E.g. All cereals & Millets, They usually have narrow and long leaves and they include certain families of grasses: orchids and lilies. Palms e.g. coconut palm, oil palm, raffia palm, and royal palm are the common trees in this group. Maize, guinea corn, millet, rice and

Crop Storage Methods

There are basically two methods of storage: in bags and in bulk. Bags can be stored either in the open air or in warehouses; bulk grain is stored in bins or silos of various capacities. a) Drying Cribs Drying crib can be used for a storage barn but it is too dangerous

Systems of Crop Production

Under the growing of crops, there are different systems in which crops can be cultivated which are usually practiced by farmers, Cropping systems vary among farms depending on the available resources and constraints; geography and climate of the farm; government policy; economic, social and political pressures; and the philosophy and culture of

Thinning of Plantain Suckers

Unlike those of most other bananas, plantain suckers develop very slowly. After harvest, all suckers start to grow at the same time and most have to be eliminated to stop competition. The tallest is left to guarantee the follow up and maintain the density. Thinning usually has to be repeated a month

Required Spacing for Plantain Cultivation

The recommended spacing is 3 m between the plantain rows and 2 m within the row (in other words. 3 m x 2 m). An alternative is 2.5 m x 2.5 m. If spaced 3 m x 2 m, 1 hectare should contain 1667 plants, but with a spacing of 2.5 m

Selecting the site for Plantain Cultivation

The site should be easily accessible, especially if the establishment of a large field is being planned. It should be well drained but not too steeply sloped. Plantain cultivation is impossible if the land becomes flooded from time to time, or has a water table at a depth of only 50 cm

Preparing the field for Plantain Cultivation

Fields are to be prepared with minimum disturbance to the soil (no-tillage farming). In consequence, manual clearing should be preferred to mechanical deforestation because bulldozers always remove topsoil with the important organic matter and compact the remaining soil. When an old natural fallow is cleared, the debris from the forest should be

Ways of Preparing of Plantain suckers

Suckers are separated from their mother plant with a spade or machete. The sucker corm must not be damaged or chipped. Consequently the corm should be carefully peeled with a machete. The pseudo stem of the suckers should be cut off a few centimeters above the corm. Peeling of the corm delays

Method of Planting Plantain Suckers (PPS)

Suckers are planted immediately after field preparation. Plant holes are prepared with a minimum size of about 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm. Care should be taken to separate the topsoil from bottom soil. The sucker is placed in the hole and its corm is covered, first with the topsoil

Plantain’s Planting Period (PPP)

Plantains can be planted throughout the rainy season. However, they should grow vigorously and without stress during the first 3 to 4 months after planting, and therefore they should not be planted during the last months of the rainy season. Planting with the first rains seems agronomically sound but not financially advantageous.

Weed Management on Plantain Cultivation

Weeds can be hand-pulled or chemically controlled. Paraquat and simazine are appropriate herbicides since they control the weeds without affecting the plantains, unless leaves are accidentally sprayed. Glyphosate, diuron and gramuron are not recommended as they can be phytotoxic to plantains. Plantains should always be weed-free. Weed control starts during field preparation.

Plantain Propping

The heavy weight of the plantain bunch bends all bearing plants and can cause doubling (pseudo stem breaks), snap- off (corm breaks, leaving a part in the ground) or uprooting, also called tip-over (the entire corm with roots comes out of the ground). Plants are generally weak during the dry season and

Plantain Planting Materials

Several types of conventional planting material exist which includes: Peeper:a small sucker emerging from the soil. Sword sucker: a large sucker with lanceolated leaves also known as the best conventional planting material. Maiden sucker: This is a large sucker with foliage leaves. Bits: These are pieces of a chopped corm. A new

Plantain Mulching

Organic matter is essential for plantain cultivation . External sources of mulch can consist of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), which is rich in potassium, or cassava peelings, wood shavings, palm bunch refuse, dried weeds, kitchen refuse, and so on. Collecting and transporting mulch are expensive in time and labor. The most convenient

Plantain Inter-cropping

Plantain fields are arranged in rows spaced 3 m x 2 m. As the canopy closes only some 5 to 6 months after planting, a fair amount of inter-row space remains un-exploited during the first months. This space can be used for plants which have a short life cycle and which do

Plantain Fertilizer Application

The plantain crop always benefits from the use of fertilizer (table 1). The yield from fertilized plants can be up to 10 times higher than that from unfertilized plants. The amount of fertilizer needed depends on soil fertility and soil type. General recommendations cannot be made as these should be based on

Plantain Cultivars

So far, At least 116 plantain cultivars have been identified in the West and Central Africa. Meanwhile the plant size and bunch type are the most important characteristics for production purposes. The plant size depends on the number of leaves produced before flowering as giant produces more than 38 foliage leaves; medium

Plantain’s Climatic Requirement

Plantains, like other bananas. require a hot and humid environment. Ideally, the average air temperature should be about 30°C and rainfall at least 100 mm per month. Rainfall should be well distributed throughout the year and dry seasons should be as short as possible. Irrigation is not suitable nor economically worthwhile for

Introduction and Morphology of Plantain

Plantain and Banana are staple crops grown throughout the tropics. In Africa, plantain and Banana are also an important source of carbohydrate in the diet of more than 70 million people. Plantain and Banana are also an important source of revenue for farmers who produce the crops in small-scale field plantations and

Managing the fallow period in Plantains

A field which becomes unproductive should be left fallow. If plantains are to be planted again after a fallow period, the following points should be considered. At the beginning of the fallow, all plantain mats should be entirely destroyed. Otherwise, remaining plants could maintain nematode and stem borer populations which would readily

Harvesting of Plantain Bunches

The bearing plant is cut and the bunch, 3 to 4 months old, is harvested when 1 or 2 fingertips of the first hand start yellowing. The bunch usually then ripens within a week. Care has to be taken that the bunch does not drop on the ground when the main plant

Disease and pest control of Plantain

Black sigatoka is the major disease attacking plantains; nematodes and stemborers are the major pests. Black sigatoka is a leaf spot disease caused by the fungus “Mycosphaerel/a fijiensis. All known plantain cultivars are susceptible to this wind-borne fungus. Leaves first show yellow spots which later turn brown and black. Ultimately the leaf

Controlling high mat on Plantain

After production of several ratoon crops, the upper surface of corms in aging plantain fields can be seen above soil level. The exposure of the corms, which is called high mat, is believed to have several causes. The nature of ratooning in plantains seems to be particularly important. High mat exposes the