How Chloropicrin application increases Production and Profit Potential for Potato Growers

How Chloropicrin application increases Production and Profit Potential for Potato Growers

The chemical compound chloropicrin was first synthesized in 1848 by Scottish chemist John Stenhouse and first applied to agriculture in 1920, when it was used to cure tomato “soil sickness.” Over the next decade, it was used to restore pineapple productivity in Hawaii and to address soil fungal problems in California. Over time, it began to be widely used as a fungicide, herbicide, insecticide, and nematicide. Chloropicrin was first used on potato in 1940 as a wireworm suppressant and then in 1965 as a verticillium suppressant. Farmers stopped using it…

Read More

How Organic Animal Farms benefit Birds Nesting

How Organic Animal Farms benefit Birds Nesting

The abundance of bird species living in agricultural environments has decreased both in Finland and elsewhere in Europe. Attempts to rectify the situation have been made with the help of agri-environment-climate subsidies. They are granted to agricultural producers by the EU for implementing measures that are presumed to be beneficial to the environment. There is a range of such subsidies, but their potential effects on biodiversity at national scales have been seldom comprehensively investigated. As indicated by a recent study conducted in Finland, the proximity of organic animal farms increased…

Read More

How to Produce Lab-Grown Edible insects and Lab-grown meat

How to Produce Lab-Grown Edible insects and Lab-grown meat

Livestock farming is destroying our planet. It is a major cause of land and water degradation, biodiversity loss, acid rain, coral reef degeneration, deforestation and of course, climate change. Plant-based diets, insect farming, lab-grown meat and genetically modified animals have all been proposed as potential solutions. Which is best? All of these combined, say researchers at Tufts University. Writing in Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, they explain why lab-grown insect meat fed on plants, and genetically modified for maximum growth, nutrition and flavor could be a superior green alternative for…

Read More

How Subsistence Hunting threaten Local Food Security

How Subsistence Hunting threaten Local Food Security

Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems is in jeopardy from a variety of factors. The authors say that the relatively small groups that hunted in large and mostly undisturbed forests, using traditional weapons, have been replaced by a growing population using fragmented habitats and modern hunting methods. Meanwhile, increased exploitation from mining, oil exploitation…

Read More

Why Farmers have less leisure time than Hunters

Today’s Debate Topic: Why Farming is regarded as a Dirty Job

Hunters who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbors, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women. According to a recent article released by Science Daily, For two years, a team including University of Cambridge anthropologist Dr Mark Dyble, lived with the Agta, a population of small scale hunter-gatherers from the northern Philippines who are increasingly engaging in agriculture. Every day, at regular intervals between…

Read More