How to control Cassava Diseases and Pests

Pests and diseases are the major reasons why many agribusinesses fail. They increase the loss of cassava which should have contributed to your overall profit. The major pests and diseases of cassava are: 1. Thrips and Mites: Can be controlled using a recommended miticide and Insect Growth Regulators. These pests are prevalent during dry periods and decreases as rainfall increases. 2. African cassava mosaic virus: The African cassava mosaic virus causes the leaves of the cassava plant to wither. When such withering occurs, it limits the growth of the root.…

Read More

Unknown Amazing Benefits of Planting Cassava

Cassava has many uses and its uses cuts across several production industries. Cassava has gained wide usage in industries for the production of paper, ethanol, pharmaceuticals, biofuels, starch, and flour. Nowadays, cassava flour is being encouraged to be used in the production of bread, doughnuts and other confectioneries. Cassava can also be processed into fufu and ‘garri’; a popular food among many Nigerians. Not only is the root of cassava important for the production of food, but its leaves can also be used as a vegetable for soup or as…

Read More

A Comprehensive Guide on How to Plant Cassava

Cassava (Manihot Esculenta) is the third-largest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics after rice and maize. In this post, we will highlight the comprehensive guide on how to start a cassava farm. According to Wikipedia, the origin of cassava can be traced back to West-central Brazil where it was likely first domesticated no more than 10,000 years BP. It was however introduced to Africa by Portuguese traders from Brazil in the 16th century. Today, Nigeria ranks first position as the world largest producer of cassava. This is followed by…

Read More

Thinning of Plantain Suckers

Unlike those of most other bananas, plantain suckers develop very slowly. After harvest, all suckers start to grow at the same time and most have to be eliminated to stop competition. The tallest is left to guarantee the follow up and maintain the density. Thinning usually has to be repeated a month later, as new suckers will have emerged by that time. Suckers are thinned with a machete. The sucker pseudo stem is cut off near its corm and the point of the machete is twisted in the growing tip,…

Read More

Required Spacing for Plantain Cultivation

The recommended spacing is 3 m between the plantain rows and 2 m within the row (in other words. 3 m x 2 m). An alternative is 2.5 m x 2.5 m. If spaced 3 m x 2 m, 1 hectare should contain 1667 plants, but with a spacing of 2.5 m x 2.5 m, it should contain 1600 plants. Rows should be straight in flat fields to give plants the maximum amount of sunlight. However, on sloping land, rows should follow the contour lines in order to decrease soil…

Read More

Selecting the site for Plantain Cultivation

The site should be easily accessible, especially if the establishment of a large field is being planned. It should be well drained but not too steeply sloped. Plantain cultivation is impossible if the land becomes flooded from time to time, or has a water table at a depth of only 50 cm or less. The soil should be rich in organic matter (black soil). Hence fields in a long natural fallow, under an improved established fallow or with a lot of mulch are recommended.

Read More

Plantain Inter-cropping

Plantain fields are arranged in rows spaced 3 m x 2 m. As the canopy closes only some 5 to 6 months after planting, a fair amount of inter-row space remains un-exploited during the first months. This space can be used for plants which have a short life cycle and which do not compete with plantains. Groundnut, yam, cocoyam and maize are suitable inter-crops although maize effectively delays the plantain harvest by about 2 months. Cassava and cowpea are not suitable, because their yields are reduced under the shade of…

Read More

Preparing the field for Plantain Cultivation

Fields are to be prepared with minimum disturbance to the soil (no-tillage farming). In consequence, manual clearing should be preferred to mechanical deforestation because bulldozers always remove topsoil with the important organic matter and compact the remaining soil. When an old natural fallow is cleared, the debris from the forest should be burned if plantain cultivation is planned for 1 or 2 cycles only. If perennial cultivation is being considered, planting should be done through the mulch .Young fallows of about 3 to 5 years or improved legume fallows should…

Read More

Ways of Preparing of Plantain suckers

Suckers are separated from their mother plant with a spade or machete. The sucker corm must not be damaged or chipped. Consequently the corm should be carefully peeled with a machete. The pseudo stem of the suckers should be cut off a few centimeters above the corm. Peeling of the corm delays the development of nematode infestation, while cutting of the pseudo stem reduces bulkiness and improves early growth of the newly planted sucker. The peeling process is just like that for cassava. A freshly peeled healthy corm ought to…

Read More

Method of Planting Plantain Suckers (PPS)

Suckers are planted immediately after field preparation. Plant holes are prepared with a minimum size of about 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm. Care should be taken to separate the topsoil from bottom soil. The sucker is placed in the hole and its corm is covered, first with the topsoil and then with the bottom soil. In the plant hole, the side of the sucker corm which was formerly attached to the corm of its mother plant is placed against the wall of the hole. The opposite side…

Read More